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Topics: Automotive industry, General Motors, Holden Pages: 81 (18743 words) Published: May 20, 2014
Australia’s Automotive
Manufacturing Industry

Productivity Commission
Preliminary Findings Report
December 2013

This is a preliminary findings report.
The Commission will release a position
paper in January 2014 and will finalise
its report following further public
consultation and input.

 Commonwealth of Australia 2013
ISBN

978-1-74037-467-5

This work is copyright. Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, the work may be reproduced in whole or in part for study or training purposes, subject to the inclusion of an acknowledgment of the source. Reproduction for commercial use or sale requires prior written permission from the Productivity Commission. Requests and inquiries concerning reproduction and rights should be addressed to Media and Publications (see below). This publication is available from the Productivity Commission website at www.pc.gov.au. If you require part or all of this publication in a different format, please contact Media and Publications.

Publications Inquiries:
Media and Publications
Productivity Commission
Locked Bag 2 Collins Street East
Melbourne VIC 8003
Tel:
Fax:
Email:

(03) 9653 2244
(03) 9653 2303
maps@pc.gov.au

General Inquiries:
Tel:
(03) 9653 2100 or (02) 6240 3200
An appropriate citation for this paper is:
Productivity Commission 2013, Australian
Preliminary Findings Report, Canberra.

Automotive Manufacturing

Industry,

The Productivity Commission
The Productivity Commission is the Australian Government’s independent research and advisory body on a range of economic, social and environmental issues affecting the welfare of Australians. Its role, expressed most simply, is to help governments make better policies, in the long term interest of the Australian community. The Commission’s independence is underpinned by an Act of Parliament. Its processes and outputs are open to public scrutiny and are driven by concern for the wellbeing of the community as a whole.

Further information on the Productivity Commission can be obtained from the Commission’s website (www.pc.gov.au) or by contacting Media and Publications on (03) 9653 2244 or email: maps@pc.gov.au

Terms of reference

REVIEW OF THE AUSTRALIAN AUTOMOTIVE MANUFACTURING
INDUSTRY
Productivity Commission Act 1998
I, Joseph Benedict Hockey, Treasurer, pursuant to Parts 2 and 3 of the Productivity Commission Act 1998, hereby request that the Productivity Commission undertake an inquiry into public support for Australia’s automotive manufacturing industry, including passenger motor vehicle and automotive component production.

Background
Australian and State Government support for the automotive manufacturing industry is provided through the current Automotive Transformation Scheme, which provides assistance in respect of production and support for research and development and capital investment, through ad hoc grants provided to vehicle and component manufacturers, through tariffs and through relief from some state taxes. With the withdrawal of some manufacturers from local production in Australia, recent uncertainty surrounding tax policies affecting the industry, variability in exchange rates and the increasing openness of Australia’s automotive retail market, the circumstances under which assistance is provided to the industry warrant review.

Scope of the Inquiry
The Australian Government desires an internationally competitive and globally integrated automotive manufacturing sector and wishes to ensure that any support for the local automotive manufacturing industry is accountable, transparent and targeted at the long-term sustainability of the sector. In consultation with a broad range of stakeholders, and in the context of the Australian Government’s desire to improve the overall performance of the Australian economy, the Commission should, in its Review of the Australian Automotive Manufacturing Industry (the ‘Review’):

TERMS OF
REFERENCE

iii...

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Ewing, J. 2013, ‘Ford Pays a High Price for Plant Closing in Belgium’, New York
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